AMicale des COXiens

Forum des actionnaires particuliers de NicOx
 
AccueilAccueil  GalerieGalerie  S'enregistrerS'enregistrer  ConnexionConnexion  

Partagez | 
 

 Painkiller Trial Raises Questions for FDA, Pfizer

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas 
Aller à la page : 1, 2  Suivant
AuteurMessage
chopy

avatar

Nombre de messages : 203
Age : 40
Localisation : Toulouse
Date d'inscription : 09/03/2007

MessageSujet: Painkiller Trial Raises Questions for FDA, Pfizer   Sam 22 Mai - 16:55

Article qui date du 11 mars 2009 !

Critics Charge Celebrex Study Is Unethical
By Shannon Brownlee and Jeanne Lenzer | March 11, 2009 Comment
E-mail Print In February 2005, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) called a three-day hearing to review the risks of three painkillers known as COX-2 inhibitors. From its inception, the hearing — conducted by an FDA advisory panel — was beset by controversy. One of the COX-2 drugs, Vioxx, had recently been withdrawn from the market for safety reasons. The FDA had also removed and then reinstated one of its own experts from the panel, and there were published reports of suppressed drug safety data regarding not just Vioxx, but another COX-2 inhibitor, Celebrex. Emotions were running high as the 32-member panel of outside advisers assembled in a Hilton Hotel ballroom in Gaithersburg, Maryland, to hear testimony from scientists, patients, and drug company representatives on the risks and benefits of the painkillers.

Dr. Steven Nissen, a top cardiologist at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio, is leading a controversial study into the health risks of Celebrex, ibuprofen, and naproxen. Photo courtesy of the Cleveland Clinic. The previous September, pharmaceutical firm Merck had withdrawn Vioxx voluntarily, shortly before evidence surfaced to suggest that the drug caused an estimated 39,000 and 60,000 deaths from heart attacks and strokes. The advisory panel considered whether the other two COX-2s, Celebrex and Bextra, might also increase the risk of cardiovascular problems, including death, and whether any of the three drugs should be allowed to remain on the market. At the end of the hearings, the panel would conclude that all three drugs increase the risk of cardiovascular problems. Yet the FDA subsequently issued a decision that seemed to many observers to ignore an important conclusion by its own advisers. More worrisome, said critics, the FDA’s ruling sowed confusion among both doctors and patients about which painkillers are the safest.

Now, four years later, one of the key players in that drama is facing questions about the safety of a study he is leading that tests one of those painkillers on the very group of people at highest risk of dying from the drug. Dr. Steven Nissen, a top heart doctor at the famed Cleveland Clinic and sometime FDA critic well-known for his early warning about the dangers of Vioxx, is the principal investigator on the study known as PRECISION (the Prospective Randomized Evaluation of Celecoxib Integrated Safety versus Ibuprofen Or Naproxen). PRECISION is a $100 million, multinational study of Celebrex and two other painkillers, ibuprofen and naproxen. The study is sponsored by Pfizer, the maker of Celebrex. And both Pfizer and Nissen believe the study is badly needed to find out which of these drugs is least risky. But critics argue that the trial is unethical. They say it puts patients who participate at unnecessary risk in order to get answers that, to a large extent, the medical community already has, and which would be clear to doctors if only the FDA had not muddied the waters with its 2005 ruling.

The story of the FDA’s hearing, the agency’s subsequent decisions on painkillers, and the PRECISION trial also illustrates larger, more complex problems at the agency, which is under constant fire from the press, members of Congress, and patient safety groups for being too close to the drug industry. That closeness, those critics say, has led the agency to be too quick to approve dangerous drugs and too slow to remove them from the market once danger signs appear. An agency spokesperson declined to comment. Former FDA commissioner Andrew von Eschenbach, who resigned in January, previously told reporters that the agency needs to work more closely with drug companies so that the FDA will be “a bridge to the future, not a barrier to the future.” But there’s no shortage of people who believe the FDA’s actions are failing to protect public health. “At the FDA,” says Dr. Curt Furberg, a professor of Public Health Sciences at the Wake Forest University School of Medicine, “they are judged by how many drugs they approve, not by how many lives they save.”


NSAIDs are an older category of painkillers that have caused stomach bleeding in a small subset of patients. COX-2 Inhibitors, designed to address that issue, were found to increase the risk of cardiac problems. PRECISION backers say their trial will answer crucial comparative safety questions, but critics say the answers should already be clear, and charge that PRECISION is unethical.
Ignoring the Advisers
Two of the COX-2 inhibitors — Vioxx and Celebrex — were brought to market amid great fanfare in the late 1990s. In November, 2001, Pfizer introduced a third COX-2, Bextra. These drugs, hailed as “super-aspirins” by the press, were invented in part to address the biggest drawback of an older category of painkillers known as non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs — a category which includes aspirin, ibuprofen (the active ingredient in Advil), and naproxen (the active ingredient in Aleve). The problem with these NSAIDs is that they can cause potentially life-threatening bleeding in the stomach and intestines in a small subset of people, particularly the elderly. Vioxx and its chemical cousins were designed specifically to avoid gastrointestinal bleeds.

Within a few years, though, evidence began to emerge that the super-aspirins weren’t so super. While Vioxx provided some protection against gastrointestinal bleeds, it increased the risk of heart attacks and strokes — a problem that exceeded its protective benefit. By the time Merck pulled Vioxx from the market, in September 2004, it appeared that Celebrex and Bextra also posed some of the same risks, and FDA was feeling mounting pressure to act. The agency pulled together two advisory committees, the Arthritis Committee and the Drug Safety and Risk Management Committee, and charged them jointly with the task of weighing the evidence for and against the COX-2s. The FDA has many committees, which are composed of outside experts and are charged with helping the agency make such decisions as whether or not to approve a new drug for market or withdraw one that is already there.

By the time the joint COX-2 committee was called to order, Pfizer, the manufacturer of Celebrex, had already laid plans for a “longer term study” of its drug, according to documents obtained by the Center. Slated to enroll 20,000 subjects, a process still ongoing, that study — PRECISION — is the largest trial ever involving a COX-2 drug. In the wake of mounting concerns about Vioxx and the safety of all the COX-2s, PRECISION is crucial to Pfizer’s ability to keep Celebrex sales afloat. Even if the trial were to show that Celebrex is more dangerous than its chemical cousins, so long as the study is ongoing the company can claim that there is still no solid evidence, thus signaling to physicians that they should continue prescribing it as long as the results are not yet in.

Whether or not Pfizer would be able to go forward with the PRECISION trial hinged in part on how the joint advisory panel answered three questions: Should Vioxx be allowed back on the market with stringent warnings and restrictions on its use? Should Celebrex and Bextra be permitted to remain on pharmacy shelves? How did the non-selective NSAIDs stack up in terms of safety? If the combined committee said Celebrex was clearly more dangerous than NSAIDs, the PRECISION trial would be difficult to justify, since it would mean putting patients at risk for the sake of a question that had already been answered.

The committee members sifted through a mountain of data, including a study conducted by Pfizer that the company had kept hidden from doctors for more than four years. That study, unearthed by the drug watchdog group Public Citizen, showed that Alzheimer’s patients taking Celebrex were twice as likely to die from a heart attack or stroke than patients taking a placebo, or dummy pill. The company did not publicly post its findings until January 24, 2005, after another study showed similar results. The data convinced the committee that all three COX-2s increased the risk of cardiac events, though of the three, Celebrex appeared the least dangerous. The committee also found that only Vioxx protected patients against a gastrointestinal bleed, but it posed the greatest cardiac risk.

The experts then turned to the question of safety of the non-selective NSAIDs. Aspirin clearly protected against heart attacks and some strokes, and it appeared as if naproxen might do so as well. The evidence on ibuprofen was murkier. The committee, while unanimously voting that Celebrex caused risk, voted 31-1 in favor of keeping the drug on the market for specially selected patients. The experts were split on keeping Bextra and bringing back Vioxx, with those in favor barely in the majority on both counts.

But one thing was clear to the committee: the COX-2s were potentially dangerous, clearly more so than one of the non-selective NSAIDs, naproxen, and likely more so than ibuprofen. The experts recommended that the COX-2s be allowed to stay on the market only if they carried a “black box” on the package “inserts” — a warning outlined in black to alert both physicians and patients to their dangers. At a press conference at the conclusion of the panel’s deliberation, Dr. Alastair Wood, committee chairman, and then professor of medicine and pharmacology at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, said, “I think physicians need to be more thoughtful about how they use [COX-2s] in the future. It would be a brave man or woman who started a patient with a clear history of heart disease on these drugs.”

The FDA, however, decided to heed only part of its own advisory panel’s advice. In April 2005, the agency ordered Bextra off the market, and Merck later voluntarily decided not to reintroduce Vioxx. But instead of urging doctors to consider alternatives, such as naproxen, the FDA ordered black box warnings on all non-selective NSAIDs along with the remaining COX-2s. The effect was to make the non-selective NSAIDs seem as risky as the COX-2s. Dr. Garret FitzGerald, professor of medicine and pharmacology at the University of Pennsylvania, and a consultant to the advisory panel, told the Center, “To lump all painkillers under a black box diluted the message about COX-2s and sowed confusion among practitioners and consumers.”

Boon to Pfizer
While the FDA is not required to take the advice of its committees, it rarely strays so far from their conclusions. Precisely how and why FDA officials decided to diverge from its committee’s findings in this case, and impose a black box warning on all painkillers, not just the COX-2s, remains a secret. Although the Center received 408 pages of documents under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) that relate to the agency’s final decision, hundreds of additional pages were excluded or redacted from release because they constituted internal deliberations by FDA. Such deliberations are exempt from release in order to protect government officials from operating in a fishbowl atmosphere. (The FDA has refused to release any documents relating to FDA oversight of the ongoing PRECISION trial on the grounds that the documents contain “confidential commercial information,” according to Karen Riley, spokesperson for the agency.)

In the view of many drug researchers and public safety advocates, the FDA’s decision reflects the degree to which the agency is influenced by the very industry it is supposed to regulate. “The decision to label all painkillers with the same warning has the effect of watering down the concerns about the COX-2 inhibitors,” charges Furberg, an advisory panel member for the COX-2 hearings. Pfizer, as the manufacturer of the only two COX-2s on the market at the time, stood to gain the most by the FDA’s decision.

This point is underscored by documents obtained by the Center. In a letter to the FDA dated March 10, 2005, a month before the agency acted, Pfizer agreed to re-label its drugs, Celebrex and Bextra. But the company also emphasized that because of “the potential for an increased risk of cardiovascular events for the older non-selective NSAIDs, Pfizer firmly believes that such products [the non-selective NSAIDs] must be included as part of the relevant class of products for which this issue is relevant.” In other words, if the FDA was going to require black boxes on the COX-2s, Pfizer wanted black box warnings on the patient information “inserts” of all the non-selective NSAIDs, including ones they manufactured, even though the weight of the evidence said that COX-2s were more dangerous than most NSAIDs, and naproxen might be neutral or even protect the heart. FDA spokesperson Riley stated there were no substantive communications with industry after the COX-2 advisory panel meeting other than the single letter from Pfizer that was released to the Center.

Celebrex is one of a group of drugs originally hailed as “super-aspirins.” But there is now some evidence that the painkiller manufactured by Pfizer may increase the risk of heart attack and stroke. Credit: Food and Drug Administration. Several drug research experts contacted by the Center believe that both Pfizer and the agency had reasons to want a black box warning on all the painkillers. From the company’s perspective, placing a warning on all painkillers could blunt any negative effect on sales of COX-2s, which have average wholesale prices 10 to 20 times greater than ibuprofen, the most commonly used generic non-selective NSAID. Pfizer needed to keep up its sales of Celebrex, which had plummeted 47 percent to $411 million in the first quarter of 2005, in the wake of the Vioxx scandal. The company would have been justifiably concerned that a black box warning on the drug’s package inserts would depress sales further. A warning on the other NSAIDs, drugs that patients had been taking over the counter for many years, might well make the warning on Celebrex seem less worrisome.

“Pharma has always pushed this strategy,” according to a pharmaceutical company researcher who asked to remain anonymous for fear of being unable to work for the industry. If they have to put a black box warning on their drugs, companies want warning labels to apply to all the drugs in a class. Their thinking, according to the researcher, is “the safety warning is going to hurt us, but at least it’s also going to hurt our competitors. With class labeling, all ships rise and fall with the tide so we’re all in the same boat.”

Sally Beatty, a Pfizer spokesperson, responded by noting that the black box warning on all the painkillers “was issued following a thorough review of the available…data.” The warning, she added, “was issued at the discretion of the FDA, not Pfizer.”

The pharmaceutical company researcher contends that the FDA, for its part, sees black box warnings on all drugs in a class as a way to avoid getting into hot water with industry, which often goes to Congress to complain when it does not like an agency ruling. The researcher said, “This is just another example of FDA basing policy on something other than science.”

Sowing Doubt
Pfizer had another reason to welcome a black box warning on the entire class of painkillers, in the view of critics. It allowed the company to maintain that doctors and patients can’t know which painkiller is safest without data from the company’s PRECISION trial. Without definitive evidence, doctors might assume Celebrex is no more dangerous than NSAIDs and continue to prescribe it.

Nissen, the trial’s principal investigator, has a different interpretation. “The trial is designed to answer a very critical scientific question: Which of the available drugs carries the lowest risk of heart-related complications?” he says. “The only way to answer that question is to do a massive head-to-head trial in people of sufficient risk to actually get enough cardiovascular events for precise results.” Other researchers support this reasoning. Colin Baigent, a professor of epidemiology at Oxford University in England, who recently completed a large analysis of the data on painkillers and safety, told the Center he believes the trial will be useful.

Beatty, the Pfizer spokesperson, rejected claims that the study is unethical, telling the Center, “We strongly support the risk-benefit profile of Celebrex for many patients suffering from arthritis as communicated in its approved labeling. As we have previously said, we, along with the Executive Committee of PRECISION chaired by Dr. Steve Nissen, believe the PRECISION study is not only ethical but extremely important to better understand the safety of NSAID pain relievers.”

Launched in December 2005, the PRECISION trial involves randomly assigning patients from 637 sites in countries that include the United States, Canada, Ukraine, Mexico, Peru, and Colombia to take Celebrex, naproxen, or ibuprofen. Neither patients nor their doctors will know which pill they’re getting. To be eligible, the patients must have had a either a heart attack, blocked arteries, or chronic chest pain; or diabetes, a stroke or clogged vessels in the neck or legs. By using high-risk patients, the study’s designers say they will acquire the answers to the study’s questions more quickly and definitively, because the subjects in the study will likely suffer a large number of cardiac events — on the order of 800 — during the course of the study. Nissen told The Associated Press, “We will have 10 times the statistical power of any trial ever done of these drugs.”

Regardless of the statistical power, say critics, the trial is more about marketing than science. “This trial is crucial to Celebrex sales,” says the University of Pennsylvania’s FitzGerald. PRECISION is a “post-marketing trial,” a study that is done after a drug has already come to market. Post-marketing trials can be especially helpful to extending a drug’s marketability when evidence surfaces to suggest that the drug may be dangerous or ineffective, even if the drug later proves to be harmful, said FitzGerald. “The whole idea is to sow doubt.” As long as the PRECISION trial is still ongoing, he and other critics charge, Pfizer marketers can tell physicians that the jury is still out with regard to the safety of non-selective NSAIDs, and claim that Celebrex hasn’t been shown to be any more risky. This uncertainty can only help Celebrex. The study is scheduled to finish in 2013 — the same year that Celebrex’s original exclusivity patent runs out.

Nissen insists that PRECISION is strictly about science. The trial will show which of the painkillers is the safest, he told the Center. “Are they all the same or are there differences? No one, including Dr. FitzGerald, knows the answer,” he says. Nissen pointed to the FDA’s decision to slap a black box warning on both Celebrex and the non-selective NSAIDs as justification for the trial — a decision requested by Pfizer. Nissen added, “The PRECISION trial is governed by an independent academic executive committee composed of highly experienced and respected physician-scientists, including an NIH representative.”

But Nissen’s claim that the governance of the trial is independent may not hold up. The Center has learned that two members of the executive committee resigned, because, sources say, they were upset over the degree of control that Pfizer had over the design of the study. Nissen called that claim “nonsense.”

Other critics charge that the PRECISION trial may be unethical because it puts patients who volunteer to participate at risk unnecessarily. The European Union found the risk of Celebrex to be sufficiently high that it has refused to allow the PRECISION trial to be conducted there. Dr. Sidney Wolfe, director of Public Citizen’s Health Research Group, believes the PRECISION trial exposes volunteers to unacceptable level of risk. He told the Center that the U.S. reviewers of the trial should also have “disallowed the study on ethical grounds.”

“In general, it seems ethical to do a study only if there’s reason to suspect benefit may outweigh harm,” agreed Dr. Jerome Hoffman, an expert in clinical epidemiology at the University of California, Los Angeles. In the case of Celebrex, he said, there isn’t any evidence of greater painkilling power compared with other drugs, though it’s possible that some people find it more effective than others. Celebrex isn’t any easier on the stomach than the non-selective NSAIDs. At the same time there’s strong, though not absolutely ironclad, evidence that the drug can cause harm. One study published by the American Heart Association showed that patients with pre-existing heart disease were two to four times more likely to die if they took Celebrex compared to similar patients who didn’t take the drugs, while patients taking non-selective NSAIDs had only 1.2 times the risk.“ People may argue about just how much risk is involved,” said Hoffman, “But it’s obviously not zero — especially in patients with heart disease.”

Since the test subjects enrolled in the PRECISION trial must have pre-existing heart disease as a condition of enrollment in the study, critics say that what they were told about the risks of the study is particularly worrisome. All patients who enroll in clinical trials must be fully informed about the potential risks, usually through talking with investigators and reading an “informed consent” document. When the Center requested a copy of the PRECISION trial informed consent document, Pfizer, Nissen, and trial-organizer Cleveland Clinic Coordinating Center for Clinical Research all declined to release it. The document was subsequently sent to the Center by an anonymous source. “At this time,” it states, “no studies have shown that celecoxib [Celebrex] causes more heart attacks or strokes than prescription ibuprofen or naproxen in the treatment of patients with chronic arthritis.”

“That’s just false,” says FitzGerald. “There is clear evidence that celecoxib [Celebrex] confers cardiovascular risk … so if you have had a heart attack you should avoid this drug. We don’t have similar evidence about ibuprofen and naproxen, although we have some suggestion that naproxen is less harmful.”

Nissen defended the language in the consent form, saying it had been approved by all institutional review boards at the study sites, which are required by the FDA to review informed consent documents to ensure they are accurate and provide patients with sufficient information before enrolling in a clinical trial.

In early March, Pfizer acknowledged that data from several studies of Celebrex sponsored by the company were fabricated. The studies will be withdrawn from the medical journals in which they were published. Some health experts said the revelation was stunning, and cast doubt on the body of evidence regarding Celebrex. Nonetheless, Pfizer maintains that “the fabricated data does not change the risk-benefit profile of Celebrex.”

Clearly, more reliable data on painkillers are needed, but in the view of several researchers, a better use of $100 million and thousands of human subjects than the PRECISION trial would be a study that compares naproxen, the NSAID that appears to be safest, to ibuprofen and acetaminophen, the active ingredient in Tylenol. Acetaminophen has no known serious cardiac effects, and for many people is just as effective as an NSAID at relieving pain. A study comparing naproxen and ibuprofen would be “reasonable and timely,” said FitzGerald.

But no such study appears to be in the works. Instead, the PRECISION trial continues to move forward — its outcome unknown and its justification under fire.

Follow the Center’s work on Twitter and become our fan on Facebook.

Shannon Brownlee is a senior fellow at the New America Foundation and author of Overtreated: Why Too Much Medicine Is Making Us Sicker and Poorer. Jeanne Lenzer is a medical investigative journalist and frequent contributor to the British medical journal, BMJ.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
chopy

avatar

Nombre de messages : 203
Age : 40
Localisation : Toulouse
Date d'inscription : 09/03/2007

MessageSujet: Re: Painkiller Trial Raises Questions for FDA, Pfizer   Sam 22 Mai - 16:56

La traduc Google

Painkiller de première instance soulève des questions pour la FDA, Pfizer
Les critiques lui reprochent d'études Celebrex est contraire à l'éthique
Par Brownlee et Shannon | Lenzer Jeanne Mars 11, 2009 Comment
Imprimer E-mail En Février 2005, la US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) a demandé une audience de trois jours pour examiner les risques de trois analgésiques connu comme inhibiteurs COX-2. Depuis sa création, l'audience - menée par un comité consultatif FDA - a été en proie à des controverses. L'un des médicaments inhibiteurs de la COX-2, le Vioxx, a récemment été retiré du marché pour des raisons de sécurité. La FDA a également supprimé puis rétabli l'un de ses propres experts à partir du panneau, et il y avait publié des rapports de suppression des données concernant l'innocuité des médicaments non seulement le Vioxx, mais un autre inhibiteur de la COX-2, le Celebrex. Les émotions étaient vives que le panneau 32-membre de conseillers externes, réunis dans une salle de bal Hôtel Hilton à Gaithersburg, Maryland, à entendre le témoignage de scientifiques, les patients, et des représentants des compagnies pharmaceutiques sur les risques et les avantages des analgésiques.

Le Dr Steven Nissen, cardiologue top à la Cleveland Clinic, dans l'Ohio, mène une étude controversée sur les risques de santé de Celebrex, ibuprofène et le naproxène. Photo gracieuseté de la clinique de Cleveland. Le précédent Septembre, l'entreprise pharmaceutique Merck avait retiré le Vioxx volontairement, peu de temps avant que la preuve surface de suggérer que la drogue a causé une estimation 39.000 et 60.000 décès par crise cardiaque et d'AVC. Le comité consultatif a examiné si les deux autres inhibiteurs de la COX-2, le Celebrex et le Bextra, pourrait également accroître le risque de problèmes cardio-vasculaires, y compris la mort, et si l'un des trois médicaments doivent être autorisés à rester sur le marché. À la fin des auditions, le comité à conclure que les trois médicaments augmentent le risque de problèmes cardiovasculaires. Pourtant, la FDA a ensuite publié une décision qui semblait à beaucoup d'observateurs d'ignorer une conclusion importante par ses propres conseillers. Plus inquiétant, a dit la critique, la décision de la FDA semé la confusion chez les médecins et les patients sur antidouleurs qui sont les plus sûres.

Aujourd'hui, quatre ans plus tard, l'un des principaux acteurs de ce drame est confrontée à des questions sur la sécurité d'une étude qu'il mène que les tests de l'un de ces analgésiques sur le groupe de personnes très haut risque de mourir de la drogue. Le Dr Steven Nissen, un médecin cœur top à la célèbre clinique de Cleveland et parfois critique FDA bien connu pour son premier avertissement sur les dangers du Vioxx, est le chercheur principal de l'étude connue sous le nom PRECISION (l'évaluation prospective randomisée de célécoxib de sécurité intégrée par rapport à l'ibuprofène ou le naproxène). PRECISION est une étude de 100 millions de dollars, multinationale de Celebrex et de deux autres anti-douleurs, l'ibuprofène et le naproxène. L'étude est commanditée par Pfizer, le fabricant de Celebrex. Et Pfizer et Nissen croire que l'étude est absolument nécessaire de savoir lequel de ces médicaments est le moins risqué. Mais les critiques disent que le procès est contraire à l'éthique. Ils disent qu'il met les patients qui participent à des risques inutiles afin d'obtenir des réponses que, dans une large mesure, la communauté médicale a déjà, et qui serait clairement aux médecins si ce n'est que la FDA n'avait pas brouillé les pistes avec son arrêt rendu en 2005.

L'histoire de l'audition de la FDA, les décisions ultérieures de l'agence sur les analgésiques, et le procès PRECISION illustre aussi plus grandes, des problèmes plus complexes à l'agence, qui est sous le feu constant de la presse, les membres du Congrès, et des groupes de sécurité des patients d'être trop près à l'industrie pharmaceutique. Ce rapprochement, les critiques, a conduit l'agence d'être trop rapide pour approuver les médicaments dangereux et trop lent pour les retirer du marché une fois que les signes de danger apparaît. Un porte-parole de l'Agence a refusé de commenter. Ancien commissaire de la FDA, Andrew von Eschenbach, qui a démissionné en Janvier, antérieurement déclaré aux journalistes que l'agence a besoin de travailler plus étroitement avec les compagnies pharmaceutiques de sorte que la FDA sera «un pont vers l'avenir, pas un obstacle à l'avenir." Mais il n'y a pas pénurie de gens qui croient actions de la FDA ne parviennent pas à protéger la santé publique. «À la FDA», déclare le Dr Curt Furberg, professeur de sciences de santé publique à l'École de l'Université Wake Forest de médecine », ils sont jugés par le nombre de médicaments qu'ils approuvent, et non par le nombre de vies qu'ils sauver."


Les AINS sont une ancienne catégorie des analgésiques qui ont causé des saignements d'estomac dans un petit sous-ensemble de patients. COX-2, conçu pour répondre à cette question, ont été trouvés à augmenter le risque de problèmes cardiaques. PRECISION bailleurs affirment que leur procès sera cruciale répondre aux questions de sécurité comparative, mais les critiques disent les réponses devraient déjà être clair, et la charge que la précision est contraire à l'éthique.
Ignorant les conseillers
Deux des inhibiteurs de la COX-2 - le Vioxx et le Celebrex - ont été mis sur le marché en grande pompe dans la fin des années 1990. En Novembre 2001, Pfizer a présenté un tiers de la COX-2, le Bextra. Ces médicaments, saluée comme «super-aspirine» par la presse, ont été inventés en partie pour répondre le plus grand inconvénient d'une ancienne catégorie d'analgésiques connu sous le nom non-sélective non-stéroïdiens anti-inflammatoires, les AINS ou - une catégorie qui comprend l'aspirine , l'ibuprofène (l'ingrédient actif dans Advil), et le naproxène (l'ingrédient actif dans Aleve). Le problème avec ces AINS, c'est qu'ils peuvent provoquer des saignements potentiellement mortelles dans l'estomac et les intestins dans un petit sous-ensemble de personnes, en particulier les personnes âgées. Vioxx et de ses cousins chimiques ont été spécifiquement conçue pour éviter les saignements gastro-intestinaux.

En quelques années, cependant, des preuves ont commencé à émerger que le super-aspirine n'était pas si super. Bien que le Vioxx fourni une certaine protection contre les saignements gastro-intestinaux, il a augmenté le risque d'attaques cardiaques et cérébrales - un problème qui a dépassé son effet protecteur. Au moment de Merck retiré le Vioxx du marché, en Septembre 2004, il est apparu que le Celebrex et le Bextra a également posé quelques-uns des mêmes risques, et la FDA se sentait la pression monter pour agir. L'agence a rassemblé deux comités consultatifs, le Comité d'arthrite et l'innocuité des médicaments et de gestion des risques, et les ont accusés conjointement avec la tâche d'évaluer les preuves pour et contre la COX-2. La FDA a de nombreux comités, qui sont composés d'experts extérieurs et sont chargés d'aider l'organisme à prendre des décisions telles que de savoir si ou non d'approuver un nouveau médicament pour le marché ou de retirer celle qui est déjà là.

Au moment de la COX-2 Comité mixte a été rappelé à l'ordre, Pfizer, le fabricant de Celebrex, avait déjà prévu des plans pour une «étude à plus long terme" de son médicament, selon des documents obtenus par le Centre. Prévu pour s'inscrire 20.000 sujets, un processus toujours en cours, cette étude - PRECISION - est le plus grand procès jamais impliquant un COX-2 de drogue. Dans le sillage de la montée des inquiétudes au sujet du Vioxx et de la sécurité de tous les inhibiteurs de la COX-2, la précision est cruciale pour la capacité de Pfizer pour maintenir les ventes de Celebrex à flot. Même si le procès était de montrer que le Celebrex est plus dangereux que son cousin chimique, tant que l'étude est en cours de la société ne peut prétendre qu'il n'y a pas encore de preuves solides, signalant ainsi aux médecins qu'ils doivent continuer à le prescrire aussi longtemps que le les résultats ne sont pas encore po

Que ce soit ou non Pfizer serait en mesure d'aller de l'avant avec le procès PRECISION charnière en partie sur la façon dont le comité consultatif mixte répondu à trois questions: Faut-il Vioxx pouvoir revenir sur le marché avec des avertissements sévères et des restrictions à son utilisation? Si le Celebrex et le Bextra être autorisés à rester sur les tablettes des pharmacies? Comment les AINS non sélectifs pile en termes de sécurité? Si le comité a dit combinés Celebrex a été nettement plus dangereux que les AINS, le procès PRECISION serait difficile à justifier, car cela signifierait mettre les patients à risque pour le bien d'une question qui a déjà été répondu.

Les membres du comité tamisé à travers une montagne de données, y compris une étude menée par Pfizer que la compagnie avait caché des médecins pendant plus de quatre ans. Cette étude, mis au jour par le groupe de surveillance des drogues Public Citizen, a montré que les patients Alzheimer en prenant Celebrex étaient deux fois plus susceptibles de mourir d'une crise cardiaque ou accident vasculaire cérébral que les patients prenant un placebo, ou de placebo. La société n'a pas d'afficher publiquement ses conclusions Janvier 24 mai 2005, après une autre étude a montré des résultats similaires. Les données ont convaincu le Comité que les trois inhibiteurs de la COX-2 augmente le risque d'événements cardiaques, mais des trois, Celebrex semblait le moins dangereux. La commission a également constaté que seulement Vioxx patients protégés contre un saignement gastro-intestinal, mais il a posé le plus grand risque de maladie cardiaque.

Les experts ont ensuite abordé la question de la sécurité des AINS non sélectifs. Aspirine clairement protégés contre les attaques cardiaques et de certains traits, et il semblait que le naproxène pourrait faire de même. Les éléments de preuve sur l'ibuprofène a été plus trouble. Le Comité, tout en votant à l'unanimité que Celebrex causé des risques, ont voté 31-1 en faveur du maintien du médicament sur le marché pour les patients sélectionnés. Les experts étaient divisés sur le maintien Bextra et Vioxx ramener, avec ceux en faveur peine dans la majorité des deux chefs d'accusation.

Mais une chose était claire à la commission: la COX-2 ont été potentiellement dangereux, bien plus que l'un des AINS non sélectifs, le naproxène, et probablement plus que l'ibuprofène. Les experts ont recommandé que la COX-2 soient autorisés à rester sur le marché que si elles étaient une "boîte noire" sur le paquet "inserts" - un avertissement au contour noir pour alerter les médecins et les patients à leurs dangers. Lors d'une conférence de presse à l'issue de la délibération de la commission, le professeur Dr Alastair Wood, président de la commission, puis de la médecine et de pharmacologie à Vanderbilt University Medical Center, a déclaré: "Je pense que les médecins doivent être plus réfléchis sur la façon dont ils utilisent [COX -2S] à l'avenir. Il serait un brave homme ou une femme qui a commencé un patient ayant des antécédents de maladie cardiaque clairement sur ces médicaments. "

La FDA, cependant, décidé de tenir compte qu'une partie des conseils de son propre panneau consultatif. En avril 2005, l'Office a ordonné Bextra l'écart du marché, et plus tard, Merck a volontairement décidé de ne pas réintroduire le Vioxx. Mais au lieu de pousser les médecins à envisager des alternatives, tels que le naproxène, la FDA a ordonné avertissements de boîte noire sur tous les AINS non sélectifs avec les autres inhibiteurs de la COX-2. L'effet était de rendre les AINS non sélectifs semblent aussi risquée que la COX-2. Dr. Garret FitzGerald, professeur de médecine et de pharmacologie à l'Université de Pennsylvanie, et un consultant de la commission consultative, a déclaré le Centre », à mettre tous les analgésiques en vertu d'une boîte noire diluée le message sur la COX-2 et semé la confusion parmi les praticiens et les consommateurs. "

Boon à Pfizer
Bien que la FDA n'est pas tenue de suivre les conseils de ses comités, il s'éloigne rarement si loin de leurs conclusions. Précisément comment et pourquoi fonctionnaires de la FDA a décidé de s'écarter des conclusions de son comité dans ce cas, et d'imposer un avertissement de boîte noire sur tous les analgésiques, et pas seulement de la COX-2, reste un secret. Bien que le Centre a reçu 408 pages de documents en vertu de la Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) qui se rapportent à la décision finale de l'Agence, des centaines de pages supplémentaires ont été exclus ou expurgée de libération, car ils constituent des délibérations internes de la FDA. délibérations sont exemptés de libération afin de protéger les fonctionnaires du gouvernement de fonctionner dans une atmosphère bocal. (La FDA a refusé de divulguer tous les documents relatifs à la surveillance de la FDA de l'essai PRECISION en cours sur le motif que les documents contiennent des «renseignements commerciaux confidentiels», selon Karen Riley, porte-parole de l'agence.)

De l'avis des chercheurs de nombreux médicaments et les défenseurs de la sécurité publique, la décision de la FDA reflète la mesure dans laquelle l'organisme est influencée par l'industrie même, il est censé réglementer. «La décision d'étiqueter tous les antalgiques avec le même avertissement a pour effet de diluer les préoccupations au sujet de la COX-2 inhibiteurs,« frais Furberg, un membre du comité consultatif pour la COX-2 audiences. Pfizer, le fabricant des deux seuls COX-2 sur le marché à l'époque, était le plus à gagner par décision de la FDA.

Ce point est souligné par des documents obtenus par le Centre. Dans une lettre à la FDA en date du Mars 10, 2005, un mois avant que l'Agence a agi, Pfizer a accepté de re-titrer ses médicaments, le Celebrex et le Bextra. Mais la société a également souligné qu'en raison de "la possibilité d'un risque accru d'événements cardiovasculaires pour les plus âgés AINS non sélectifs, Pfizer croit fermement que de tels produits [les AINS non sélectifs] doit être intégré dans le cadre de la classe de produits pour lesquelles cette question est pertinente. "En d'autres termes, si la FDA allait requérir des boîtes noires sur les inhibiteurs de la COX-2, Pfizer a voulu avertissements de boîte noire sur l'information des patients" inserts "de tous les AINS non sélectifs, y compris celles qu'ils Fait, même si le poids de la preuve a indiqué que la COX-2 ont été plus dangereux que la plupart des AINS, le naproxène et peut être neutre ou même à protéger le cœur. porte-parole de la FDA Riley a déclaré qu'il ya eu aucune communication avec l'industrie de fond après la réunion du comité consultatif de la COX-2, autre que la seule lettre de Pfizer qui a été publié pour le Centre.

Celebrex est partie d'un groupe de médicaments initialement salué comme «super-aspirine." Mais il ya maintenant des preuves que les anti-douleur fabriqué par Pfizer peut augmenter le risque de crise cardiaque et accident vasculaire cérébral. Crédit: Food and Drug Administration. Plusieurs spécialistes de la recherche de drogues contactés par le Centre de croire que Pfizer et l'Agence avait des raisons de vouloir une boîte noire d'avertissement sur tous les analgésiques. Du point de vue de la société, en mettant un avertissement sur tous les antalgiques peuvent atténuer toute incidence négative sur les ventes de la COX-2, qui ont en moyenne des prix de gros 10 à 20 fois plus grande que l'ibuprofène, le plus couramment utilisé génériques non-AINS sélectif. Pfizer nécessaires pour maintenir ses ventes de Celebrex, qui avait chuté de 47 pour cent à 411 millions de dollars au premier trimestre de 2005, dans le sillage du scandale du Vioxx. La société aurait été juste avec préoccupation que d'un avertissement de boîte noire sur la notice du médicament aurait un impact négatif de nouvelles ventes. Un avertissement sur les autres AINS, des médicaments que les patients avaient pris sur le comptoir pendant de nombreuses années, pourrait bien faire l'avertissement sur Celebrex semble moins préoccupante.

«Pharma a toujours poussé cette stratégie", selon un chercheur société pharmaceutique qui a demandé à rester anonyme de peur d'être incapable de travailler pour l'industrie. S'ils ont de mettre un avertissement de boîte noire sur leurs médicaments, les entreprises veulent des étiquettes d'avertissement à s'appliquer à tous les médicaments dans une classe. Leur pensée, selon le chercheur, est «l'avertissement de sécurité qui va nous faire du mal, mais au moins il va aussi faire du mal à nos concurrents. Avec la classe d'étiquetage, tous se lèvent navires et à l'automne avec la marée et nous sommes tous dans le même bateau. "

Sally Beatty, un porte-parole de Pfizer, a répondu en faisant remarquer que la boîte noire d'avertissement sur tous les analgésiques "a été délivré après un examen approfondi de la mise à disposition de données ...." La mise en garde, at-elle ajouté, "a été délivré à la discrétion de la FDA, et non pas Pfizer.

Le chercheur soutient que la société pharmaceutique de la FDA, pour sa part, voit les avertissements de boîte noire sur tous les médicaments dans une classe comme un moyen d'éviter d'entrer dans l'eau chaude avec l'industrie, qui va souvent au Congrès de se plaindre quand il n'aime pas une agence de décision . Le chercheur a dit: «Ce n'est qu'un autre exemple de la FDA de fonder sa politique sur autre chose que la science."

Semer le doute
Pfizer avait une autre raison d'accueillir un avertissement encadré de noir sur toute la classe d'analgésiques, de l'avis des critiques. Elle a permis à l'entreprise de maintenir que les médecins et les patients ne peut pas savoir qui est le plus sûr analgésique sans les données de première instance précision de la société. Sans preuve définitive, les médecins pourraient prendre Celebrex n'est pas plus dangereux que les AINS et continuent à le prescrire.

Nissen, chercheur principal de l'essai, a une interprétation différente. "Le procès est conçu pour répondre à une question très critique scientifique: Lequel des médicaments disponibles exerce le moins de risques de complications cardiaques? Dit-il. "La seule façon de répondre à cette question, c'est de faire un procès massive tête-à-tête chez les personnes d'un risque suffisant pour effectivement obtenir assez d'événements cardio-vasculaires pour des résultats précis." D'autres chercheurs l'appui de cette argumentation. Colin Baigent, un professeur d'épidémiologie à l'Université d'Oxford en Angleterre, qui a récemment terminé une analyse en grand les données sur les anti-douleurs et de la sécurité, a déclaré le centre, il estime que le procès sera utile.

Beatty, le porte-parole de Pfizer, a rejeté les allégations que l'étude est contraire à l'éthique, dit le Centre, "Nous soutenons fortement le profil bénéfice / risque du Celebrex pour de nombreux patients souffrant d'arthrite tel que communiqué dans son étiquette approuvée. Comme nous l'avons dit précédemment, nous avons, avec le Comité exécutif de PRECISION présidé par le Dr Steve Nissen, croient que l'étude de précision n'est pas seulement éthique, mais extrêmement important de mieux comprendre la sécurité des AINS analgésiques.

Lancé en Décembre 2005, le procès de précision consiste en l'assignation aléatoire de 637 patients sites dans les pays qui sont les États-Unis, le Canada, l'Ukraine, le Mexique, le Pérou et la Colombie de prendre Celebrex, le naproxène, l'ibuprofène ou. Ni les patients ni leurs médecins sauront qui pilule qu'ils reçoivent. Pour être éligibles, les patients doivent avoir eu un ou l'autre d'une crise cardiaque, les artères bloquées, ou des douleurs thoraciques chroniques ou le diabète, les navires de course ou obstrué dans le cou ou les jambes. En utilisant les patients à haut risque, les concepteurs de l'étude disent qu'ils vont acquérir les réponses aux questions de l'étude plus rapidement et définitivement, parce que les sujets de l'étude risque d'en souffrir un grand nombre d'événements cardiaques - de l'ordre de 800 - en cours de l'étude. Nissen a déclaré à l'Associated Press, «Nous aurons 10 fois la puissance statistique de l'essai jamais fait de ces médicaments."

Quelle que soit la puissance statistique, par exemple les critiques, le procès est plus sur le marketing que de la science. "Ce procès est crucial pour les ventes de Celebrex, dit l'Université de Pennsylvanie FitzGerald. PRECISION est un procès «post-marketing», une étude qui est faite après qu'un médicament est déjà venu sur le marché. essais post-marketing peut être particulièrement utile à l'extension de commercialisation d'un médicament lorsque des preuves surfaces de suggérer que le médicament peut être dangereux ou inefficaces, même si le médicament se révèle plus tard être nuisibles, a déclaré FitzGerald. «L'idée est de semer le doute." Tant que le procès PRECISION est toujours en cours, lui et d'autres critiques accusent, marketing Pfizer peut dire aux médecins que le verdict n'est pas encore en ce qui concerne la sécurité des AINS non sélectifs, et la revendication que Celebrex n'a pas été démontré d'être plus risqué. Cette incertitude ne peut que contribuer Celebrex. L'étude devrait se terminer en 2013 - la même année que le brevet d'exclusivité de Celebrex originale est épuisée.

Nissen insiste sur le fait que la précision est strictement sur la science. Le procès montrera lequel des analgésiques est la plus sûre, at-il déclaré au Centre. "Sont-ils tous les mêmes ou sont-il des différences? Personne, y compris le Dr FitzGerald, connaît la réponse, dit-il. Nissen a souligné la décision de la FDA pour gifler un avertissement encadré de noir sur les deux Celebrex et les AINS non sélectifs pour justifier le procès - une décision demandée par Pfizer. Nissen a ajouté: «Le procès PRECISION est régi par un comité exécutif indépendant composé d'universitaires chevronnés et respectés médecins-chercheurs, y compris un représentant du NIH.

Mais prétendre Nissen que la gouvernance de l'essai est indépendant ne peut pas tenir. Le Centre a appris que deux membres du comité exécutif démissionne, parce que, disent les sources, ils ont été bouleversée par le degré de contrôle que Pfizer avait sur la conception de l'étude. Nissen a appelé cette revendication "non-sens."

D'autres critiques affirment que le procès peut être contraire à l'éthique PRECISION parce qu'elle met les patients qui se portent volontaires pour participer à des risques inutiles. L'Union européenne a estimé le risque de Celebrex à être suffisamment élevé qu'il a refusé de permettre l'essai de précision pour y être effectuée. Le Dr Sidney Wolfe, directeur du groupe Public Citizen's Health Research, estime que le procès PRECISION expose les bénévoles au niveau de risque inacceptable. Il a déclaré au Centre que les commentateurs américains du procès devrait aussi avoir "refusé l'étude pour des raisons éthiques."

«En général, il semble éthique de faire une étude que si il ya des raisons de soupçonner des avantages peuvent l'emporter sur un préjudice», a convenu le Dr Jerome Hoffman, un expert en épidémiologie clinique à l'Université de Californie à Los Angeles. Dans le cas du Celebrex, dit-il, il n'y a aucune preuve de la puissance analgésique plus grande par rapport à d'autres drogues, mais il est possible que certaines personnes trouvent plus efficaces que d'autres. Celebrex n'est pas plus facile sur le ventre que les AINS non sélectifs. Dans le même temps il est fort, mais pas absolument à toute épreuve, preuve que le médicament peut causer des dommages. Une étude publié par l'American Heart Association a montré que les patients atteints d'une cardiopathie préexistante étaient de deux à quatre fois plus susceptibles de mourir s'ils prenaient Celebrex comparativement aux patients semblables qui n'ont pas pris les médicaments, alors que les patients prenant des AINS non sélectifs ont seulement 1,2 fois plus de risques. "Les gens peuvent discuter à quel point le risque est impliqué", a déclaré Hoffman, «Mais ce n'est évidemment pas de zéro - en particulier chez les patients atteints d'une cardiopathie."

Étant donné que les sujets de test inclus dans l'essai PRECISION doit avoir une maladie cardiaque préexistante comme une condition d'inscription à l'étude, les critiques disent que ce qu'ils ont dit au sujet des risques de l'étude est particulièrement inquiétant. Tous les patients qui s'inscrivent dans les essais cliniques doivent être pleinement informés des risques potentiels, généralement en discutant avec les enquêteurs et la lecture d'un «consentement éclairé» du document. Lorsque le Centre a demandé une copie du procès PRECISION document de consentement éclairé, Pfizer, Nissen, et le procès-organisateur Cleveland Clinic Centre de coordination pour la recherche clinique tous refusé de le libérer. Le document a ensuite été envoyée au Centre par une source anonyme. "A cette époque," il déclare, «aucune étude n'a démontré que le célécoxib [Celebrex] provoque des crises cardiaques ou des accidents cérébrovasculaires plus que l'ibuprofène ou le naproxène prescription dans le traitement des patients atteints d'arthrite chronique."

"C'est tout simplement faux», dit FitzGerald. "Il est clair que le célécoxib [Celebrex] confère risque cardiovasculaire ... donc si vous avez eu une crise cardiaque, vous devriez éviter ce médicament. Nous n'avons pas de preuves semblables au sujet de l'ibuprofène et le naproxène, bien que nous ayons laissé entendre que le naproxène est moins nocif. "

Nissen a défendu la langue dans le formulaire de consentement, en disant qu'il avait été approuvé par toutes les commissions d'examen institutionnel à des sites d'étude, qui sont requis par la FDA de revoir les documents de consentement éclairé afin de s'assurer qu'elles sont exactes et fournir aux patients des informations suffisantes avant de s'inscrire dans un essai clinique.

Au début de Mars, Pfizer a reconnu que les données de plusieurs études de Celebrex parrainé par la compagnie ont été fabriqués. Les études seront retirés du revues médicales dans lesquelles elles ont été publiées. Certains experts de la santé a déclaré la révélation a été impressionnante, et jettent un doute sur le corps de la preuve concernant Celebrex. Néanmoins, Pfizer soutient que «les données fabriquées ne change pas le profil bénéfice / risque du Celebrex.

De toute évidence, des données plus fiables sur les analgésiques sont nécessaires, mais de l'avis de plusieurs chercheurs, une meilleure utilisation des 100 millions de dollars et des milliers de sujets humains que le procès PRECISION serait une étude qui compare le naproxène, la prise d'AINS qui semble le plus sûr, à l'ibuprofène et l'acétaminophène, l'ingrédient actif du Tylenol. L'acétaminophène ne lui connaît pas de graves conséquences cardiaques, et pour beaucoup de gens est tout aussi efficace que d'un AINS pour soulager la douleur. Une étude comparant le naproxène et l'ibuprofène serait «raisonnable et en temps opportun», a déclaré FitzGerald.

Mais aucune étude de ce genre semble être dans les œuvres. Au lieu de cela, le procès PRECISION continue à aller de l'avant - de ses résultats inconnue et sa justification sous le feu.

Suivre les travaux du Centre sur Twitter et devenez notre fan sur Facebook.

Shannon Brownlee est Senior Fellow à la New America Foundation et auteur de surtraitées: Pourquoi trop grande médecine nous rend plus malades et les plus pauvres. Jeanne Lenzer est un journaliste d'investigation médicale et collaborateur régulier de la revue médicale britannique, BMJ.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
chopy

avatar

Nombre de messages : 203
Age : 40
Localisation : Toulouse
Date d'inscription : 09/03/2007

MessageSujet: Re: Painkiller Trial Raises Questions for FDA, Pfizer   Sam 22 Mai - 17:34

J'ai comme l'impression que si on avait eû Pfizer comme partenaire pour le Napro, le comité aurait voté à 16 vs 1 mais dans l'autre sens -)

J'ai vraiment l'impression qu'avoir voulu y aller tout seul est un combat perdu d'avance
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Netzach

avatar

Nombre de messages : 496
Date d'inscription : 11/06/2008

MessageSujet: Re: Painkiller Trial Raises Questions for FDA, Pfizer   Sam 22 Mai - 21:58

chopy a écrit:
J'ai comme l'impression que si on avait eû Pfizer comme partenaire pour le Napro, le comité aurait voté à 16 vs 1 mais dans l'autre sens -)

J'ai vraiment l'impression qu'avoir voulu y aller tout seul est un combat perdu d'avance

MG a toujours dit que tous le partenaires potentiel il attendait pour faire un partenariat, après le jugement du 12 mai.

Bom, pour moi AdCom ça etè dejà combinè avant le 12 ... probablement sur suggestion de quelque Big Pharma qu'il attendait le 13 pour voir ce qui il savait dejà ...

La motivation ? Le Naproxcinod peut reduire le marchè du Celebrex ...

Je serais tres curieux de voir le contrat avec Merck ... 4 annees d'etude 5 molecules ... le contrat avec droit de co-commercialisation ... les anti hta ... un marchè de 35 milliard chaque annèè ...

Je crois que le vrai interet c'est pour le anti-hta ... e probablement la possible revision du contrat ( de co-commercialization > Upfront+royalties)

Pfizer ou Merck le culpable ?

Mistere ...
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Carlos Alonso (carlos-al)

avatar

Nombre de messages : 624
Age : 55
Localisation : Angoulême 16
Date d'inscription : 05/02/2007

MessageSujet: Re: Painkiller Trial Raises Questions for FDA, Pfizer   Dim 23 Mai - 0:17

Netzach a écrit:
[

La motivation ? Le Naproxcinod peut reduire le marchè du Celebrex ...

Je serais tres curieux de voir le contrat avec Merck ... 4 annees d'etude 5 molecules ... le contrat avec droit de co-commercialisation ... les anti hta ... un marchè de 35 milliard chaque annèè ...

Je crois que le vrai interet c'est pour le anti-hta ... e probablement la possible revision du contrat ( de co-commercialization > Upfront+royalties)

Pfizer ou Merck le culpable ?

Mistere ...

+ 1 exact Netzach Smile la vérité est peu être ailleurs , j'ai d'ailleurs demandé a Michele de penser a une petite ristourne vis a vis de MERCK pour soulager les maux de ventre de mon ami Tristan Smile

cdt
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
alain



Nombre de messages : 366
Age : 66
Localisation : Nice
Date d'inscription : 15/05/2008

MessageSujet: Re: Painkiller Trial Raises Questions for FDA, Pfizer   Dim 23 Mai - 15:38

Netzach a écrit:
chopy a écrit:
J'ai comme l'impression que si on avait eû Pfizer comme partenaire pour le Napro, le comité aurait voté à 16 vs 1 mais dans l'autre sens -)

J'ai vraiment l'impression qu'avoir voulu y aller tout seul est un combat perdu d'avance

MG a toujours dit que tous le partenaires potentiel il attendait pour faire un partenariat, après le jugement du 12 mai.

Bom, pour moi AdCom ça etè dejà combinè avant le 12 ... probablement sur suggestion de quelque Big Pharma qu'il attendait le 13 pour voir ce qui il savait dejà ...

La motivation ? Le Naproxcinod peut reduire le marchè du Celebrex ...

Je serais tres curieux de voir le contrat avec Merck ... 4 annees d'etude 5 molecules ... le contrat avec droit de co-commercialisation ... les anti hta ... un marchè de 35 milliard chaque annèè ...

Je crois que le vrai interet c'est pour le anti-hta ... e probablement la possible revision du contrat ( de co-commercialization > Upfront+royalties)

Pfizer ou Merck le culpable ?

Mistere ...

Les 2 responsables et coupables.
Nicox a pêché par suffisance : fallait s'allie rà l'un ou à l'autre
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
querian4

avatar

Nombre de messages : 332
Localisation : Toulouse
Date d'inscription : 02/04/2007

MessageSujet: Re: Painkiller Trial Raises Questions for FDA, Pfizer   Dim 23 Mai - 17:21

Je le pense aussi.

Nicox aurait dû s'associer à un partenaire depuis fort longtemps et accepter des conditions plus raisonnables en étant moins gourmand. (MG disait qu'il était à deux doigts pour signer avec un très grand labo )

Avec un partenaire pour le Naproxinod, comme le B et S pour le glaucome je pense que nous ne serions pas là où l'on est.

Par ailleurs je vous trouve très optimistes pour la suite. Personnellement je suis plutôt inquiet concernant l'avis de la FDA après le vote récent de la Comité.

Je comprends maintenant que le dicton " le marché a toujours raison" est souvent exact.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://aristide.querian@orange.fr
Virtuelle

avatar

Nombre de messages : 1482
Localisation : Le Caire, Egypte
Date d'inscription : 14/08/2008

MessageSujet: Re: Painkiller Trial Raises Questions for FDA, Pfizer   Dim 23 Mai - 18:19

...

Tout a fait d'accord aussi...

Ceci etant, il y a une chose que l'on ne peut pas reprocher à MG, c'est de ne pas annoncer la couleur.

Personnellement, j'avais souscrit également au pacte avec partenariat. Lorsqu'il a été hors de question avant accord FDA, j'ai agi en consequence et liquide une partie de mon portefeuille.

Avant la derniere AK, MG nous a mis devant notre libre arbitre.

Rien ne sert de refaire l'histoire, si ce n'est d'anticiper le futur ?

Quelqu'un pourrait-il faire une analyse (la plus objective possible) en fonction des scenari qui s'offrent a nous aujourd'hui ??

D'avance merci !
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
querian4

avatar

Nombre de messages : 332
Localisation : Toulouse
Date d'inscription : 02/04/2007

MessageSujet: Re: Painkiller Trial Raises Questions for FDA, Pfizer   Lun 24 Mai - 10:47

En effet quelles sont les prévisions selon vous? et la suite à envisager?
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://aristide.querian@orange.fr
Invité
Invité



MessageSujet: Re: Painkiller Trial Raises Questions for FDA, Pfizer   Lun 24 Mai - 12:26

ça vaut ce que ça vaut ....

d'ici 2 semaines la FDA approche NicOx pour éclaircissement sur la notice, négociations serrées et acceptation de MG pour une approbation sans notice différentiée avec la possibilité de revoir le label dans 2 ans avec une étude phase IV de grande ampleur

dès approbation Merck communiquera sur les HTA comme par hasard ... élargissement du deal existant avec partenariat NCX 6560

entrée en phase III ncx 116 cette semaine ou semaine prochaine

volontairement optimisimiste Razz
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
gambit33500

avatar

Nombre de messages : 134
Age : 45
Date d'inscription : 11/06/2007

MessageSujet: Re: Painkiller Trial Raises Questions for FDA, Pfizer   Lun 24 Mai - 12:43

ca serait chouette simis...
je pense que le sakut de nicox passe par un partenariat sans condition avec une grosse pharma.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
JeanCox

avatar

Nombre de messages : 1008
Age : 63
Date d'inscription : 19/12/2007

MessageSujet: Re: Painkiller Trial Raises Questions for FDA, Pfizer   Lun 24 Mai - 12:56

gambit33500 a écrit:
ca serait chouette simis...
je pense que le sakut de nicox passe par un partenariat sans condition avec une grosse pharma.

Hmmmm, je ne sais pas si MG est prêt à accepter cela...
Personnellement, je ne le crois pas.

Mais ce n'est que mon avis.

PS : Le scénario de Simis obtient ma palme d'or
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
julestot



Nombre de messages : 138
Age : 41
Localisation : sud belgique
Date d'inscription : 23/03/2007

MessageSujet: Re: Painkiller Trial Raises Questions for FDA, Pfizer   Lun 24 Mai - 14:00

Simis j'adhère Smile Même si je trouve qu'au vu de la relation de confiance entre Merck et Nicox, Merck devrait rassurer quand à ses intentions et annoncer le passage en phase II et les résultats exceptionnels obtenus dans une nouvelle approche médicale permettant de traiter l'HTA en combinant le NO avec des molécules existantes. Ceci devrait se faire avant le 24 juillet, mais bon je suis sans doute dans le monde des bisounours encore Smile

Comme soulevé dans un post d'une autre file, ce qui m'inquiète c'est cette histoire de non infériorité par rapport au naproxène non démontré alors que ceci a été atteint lors des phase III sinon le dossier n'aurait même pas été présenté à la FDA et la molécule rangée dans un tiroir, non?

Bon dimanche
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
querian4

avatar

Nombre de messages : 332
Localisation : Toulouse
Date d'inscription : 02/04/2007

MessageSujet: Re: Painkiller Trial Raises Questions for FDA, Pfizer   Lun 24 Mai - 17:06

Simis j'adhère. Ce serait un moindre mal. Esperons-le
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://aristide.querian@orange.fr
fosco

avatar

Nombre de messages : 521
Age : 50
Localisation : Suisse
Date d'inscription : 11/06/2008

MessageSujet: Re: Painkiller Trial Raises Questions for FDA, Pfizer   Lun 24 Mai - 17:37

Cox ayant reçu la baffe monumentale que j'appréhendais et signalais peu avant la réunion du 12. Cox devrait venir manger dans la main des bigs pharmas, et revoir ses prétentions

Ca s'appelle la négo ... à la sauce américaine.

L'amérique est une démocratie à l'intérieur et adepte des solutions unilatérales à l'extérieur de ses frontières, ne l'oublions pas.

Par ailleurs intra-muros ça ne se passe pas beaucoup mieux chez nos amis ricains, le monde de la finance est pourri jusqu'à la moelle et nombre de petites biotechs US sont chahutées à la hausse et à la baisse par des analystes et journalistes ripoux de mèche avec des hedge funds sur le dos des petits porteurs. Quelques exemples que j'ai vécu (avec chaque fois dépôt de plainte de ma part à la SEC sans auncun retour) :

- Forte baisse sur le titre la veille d'un rally haussier historique du titre (bobjy, HGSI, DNDN, etc...) pour faire sauter les stops et ramasser ("Secouage de cocotier")
- Fort dénigrement d'un titre ayant monté très fort appuyé par un barrage médiatique négatif intense suivant le positionnement d'une large position short par un hedge fund (CVM)
- Pumpage à outrance d'une valeur sans intérêt

Jmo
Fosco
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Virtuelle

avatar

Nombre de messages : 1482
Localisation : Le Caire, Egypte
Date d'inscription : 14/08/2008

MessageSujet: Re: Painkiller Trial Raises Questions for FDA, Pfizer   Lun 24 Mai - 17:57

...

Merci de vos réponses. Vos interventions sont hautement appréciées.

Moi, chuis pommée perso. N'étant ni une pro de la finance, ni de la pharma, ni du magouillage en haut lieu soit ricain soit franchouillard, je ne sais vraiment pas qu'anticiper...

On nous a dit une chose et son contraire. Non seulement ici sur l'Amcox, mais ailleurs dans la presse. La FDA suit en général l'avis des experts... Les experts en l'occurrence se sont pris les pieds dans le tapis... soit.. sont des pions placés par les grands méchants loups... soit ! Des nuls puisque nous avions le meilleur expert d'entre tous... qui a quitte la conf par depit..

Le Napro, c'est un peu cuit, mais pas completement, car il y a un monde hors l'Amerique...Mais apres une phase IV il peut revenir en force... Dommage, il n'y aura plus bcp d'années de brevets à exploiter..Mais en fait l'espoir aujourd'hui c'est le partenariat avec Merck, car contrairement au Napro la mol est dans le parfait créno. Car soit la FDA est sympa et ne va pas se dédire (sinon, on lui fait procès ??? Hum...) et elle accepte le Napro avec la bête noire ( pardon, la boîte noire ---> phase IV a suivre). Et alors pour le coup, Merck va nous faire un pont d'or...

J'ai tout bien compris ou j'ai faux quelque part ???
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Invité
Invité



MessageSujet: Re: Painkiller Trial Raises Questions for FDA, Pfizer   Lun 24 Mai - 17:59

Virtuelle a écrit:
...

Merci de vos réponses. Vos interventions sont hautement appréciées.

Moi, chuis pommée perso. N'étant ni une pro de la finance, ni de la pharma, ni du magouillage en haut lieu soit ricain soit franchouillard, je ne sais vraiment pas qu'anticiper...

On nous a dit une chose et son contraire. Non seulement ici sur l'Amcox, mais ailleurs dans la presse. La FDA suit en général l'avis des experts... Les experts en l'occurrence se sont pris les pieds dans le tapis... soit.. sont des pions placés par les grands méchants loups... soit ! Des nuls puisque nous avions le meilleur expert d'entre tous... qui a quitte la conf par depit..

Le Napro, c'est un peu cuit, mais pas completement, car il y a un monde hors l'Amerique...Mais apres une phase IV il peut revenir en force... Dommage, il n'y aura plus bcp d'années de brevets à exploiter..Mais en fait l'espoir aujourd'hui c'est le partenariat avec Merck, car contrairement au Napro la mol est dans le parfait créno. Car soit la FDA est sympa et ne va pas se dédire (sinon, on lui fait procès ??? Hum...) et elle accepte le Napro avec la bête noire ( pardon, la boîte noire ---> phase IV a suivre). Et alors pour le coup, Merck va nous faire un pont d'or...

J'ai tout bien compris ou j'ai faux quelque part ???

cheers

n.b. 2019 pour échéance du brevet
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
bob



Nombre de messages : 506
Age : 64
Localisation : YONNE
Date d'inscription : 17/11/2007

MessageSujet: Re: Painkiller Trial Raises Questions for FDA, Pfizer   Lun 24 Mai - 18:14

Actionnaire comme vous depuis un certain temps
je n'ai pas vu le temps passé
1 an pour études supplémentaires pour accord FDA
ou accord au rabais avec FDA, mais commercialisation en europe et phase IV
avec retour en force au US plustard,(c'est demain)
et 2019 cela nous laisse un peu de (gras)
Sympa comme hypothèse SIMIS,j'adhere
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
JeanCox

avatar

Nombre de messages : 1008
Age : 63
Date d'inscription : 19/12/2007

MessageSujet: Re: Painkiller Trial Raises Questions for FDA, Pfizer   Lun 24 Mai - 18:17

Virtuelle a écrit:
...

Mais en fait l'espoir aujourd'hui c'est le partenariat avec Merck, car contrairement au Napro la mol est dans le parfait créno. Car soit la FDA est sympa et ne va pas se dédire (sinon, on lui fait procès ??? Hum...) et elle accepte le Napro avec la bête noire ( pardon, la boîte noire ---> phase IV a suivre).Et alors pour le coup, Merck va nous faire un pont d'or...

J'ai tout bien compris ou j'ai faux quelque part ???

Personnellement, je doute un peu du pont d'or quand même.
Dans le monde de la pharma (pas plus qu'ailleurs), les cadeaux doivent être rares, voire inexistants

Si nous obtenons quelque chose de Merck, c'est que nous l'aurons (largement) mérité, et qu'il ne pourront pas faire autrement.
J'suis moins bisounours, là, hein ?
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Carlos Alonso (carlos-al)

avatar

Nombre de messages : 624
Age : 55
Localisation : Angoulême 16
Date d'inscription : 05/02/2007

MessageSujet: Re: Painkiller Trial Raises Questions for FDA, Pfizer   Lun 24 Mai - 18:23

Virtuelle a écrit:
...

Merci de vos réponses. Vos interventions sont hautement appréciées.

Moi, chuis pommée perso. N'étant ni une pro de la finance, ni de la pharma, ni du magouillage en haut lieu soit ricain soit franchouillard, je ne sais vraiment pas qu'anticiper...

On nous a dit une chose et son contraire. Non seulement ici sur l'Amcox, mais ailleurs dans la presse. La FDA suit en général l'avis des experts... Les experts en l'occurrence se sont pris les pieds dans le tapis... soit.. sont des pions placés par les grands méchants loups... soit ! Des nuls puisque nous avions le meilleur expert d'entre tous... qui a quitte la conf par depit..

Le Napro, c'est un peu cuit, mais pas completement, car il y a un monde hors l'Amerique...Mais apres une phase IV il peut revenir en force... Dommage, il n'y aura plus bcp d'années de brevets à exploiter..Mais en fait l'espoir aujourd'hui c'est le partenariat avec Merck, car contrairement au Napro la mol est dans le parfait créno. Car soit la FDA est sympa et ne va pas se dédire (sinon, on lui fait procès ??? Hum...) et elle accepte le Napro avec la bête noire ( pardon, la boîte noire ---> phase IV a suivre). Et alors pour le coup, Merck va nous faire un pont d'or...

J'ai tout bien compris ou j'ai faux quelque part ???

tout bon virtuelle Smile la vie est un long fleuve tranquille... clown


cdt
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Virtuelle

avatar

Nombre de messages : 1482
Localisation : Le Caire, Egypte
Date d'inscription : 14/08/2008

MessageSujet: Re: Painkiller Trial Raises Questions for FDA, Pfizer   Lun 24 Mai - 18:44

...
votre élan d'enthousiasme a mon dernier post me touche !

Je pense qu'il provient avant tout du respect que vous m'accordez car je n'ai jamais approché en message personnel aucun d'entre vous pour avoir des tuyaux.

A force de vous suivre et de vous lire, vous me devenez très sympathiques et bien sur l'envie de vous suivre est forte...

Mais la peur demeure...
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
JeanCox

avatar

Nombre de messages : 1008
Age : 63
Date d'inscription : 19/12/2007

MessageSujet: Re: Painkiller Trial Raises Questions for FDA, Pfizer   Lun 24 Mai - 20:24

Virtuelle a écrit:
...
Mais la peur demeure...

La peur suscite la prudence.

La prudence est mère de sureté.

La sureté est très recherchée par le genre féminin.

Le genre masculin éprouve des sentiments pour le genre féminin.

Les sentiments entrainent souvent la sympathie.

La boucle est bouclée.
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Virtuelle

avatar

Nombre de messages : 1482
Localisation : Le Caire, Egypte
Date d'inscription : 14/08/2008

MessageSujet: Re: Painkiller Trial Raises Questions for FDA, Pfizer   Lun 24 Mai - 23:33

Tu

Tu as raison Jeancox, nous les femmes avons une approche un peu différente que vous...

...
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur
Invité
Invité



MessageSujet: Re: Painkiller Trial Raises Questions for FDA, Pfizer   Lun 24 Mai - 23:42

Virtuelle a écrit:
Tu

Tu as raison Jeancox, nous les femmes avons une approche un peu différente que vous...

...

on ferait mieux de les écouter des fois ... Twisted Evil
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Benoit Maritan

avatar

Nombre de messages : 428
Age : 41
Localisation : Nouméa
Date d'inscription : 01/09/2008

MessageSujet: Re: Painkiller Trial Raises Questions for FDA, Pfizer   Mar 25 Mai - 0:10

simis a écrit:
d'ici 2 semaines la FDA approche NicOx pour éclaircissement sur la notice, négociations serrées et acceptation de MG pour une approbation sans notice différentiée avec la possibilité de revoir le label dans 2 ans avec une étude phase IV de grande ampleur

dès approbation Merck communiquera sur les HTA comme par hasard ... élargissement du deal existant avec partenariat NCX 6560

entrée en phase III ncx 116 cette semaine ou semaine prochaine

volontairement optimisimiste

La première partie du scénario me parait envisageable (accord FDA sans notice différentiée). Pour le reste, j'ai plus de mal à croire à l'enchainement des news dans un délais si court!
Revenir en haut Aller en bas
Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://www.mbm.nc
Contenu sponsorisé




MessageSujet: Re: Painkiller Trial Raises Questions for FDA, Pfizer   

Revenir en haut Aller en bas
 
Painkiller Trial Raises Questions for FDA, Pfizer
Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut 
Page 1 sur 2Aller à la page : 1, 2  Suivant
 Sujets similaires
-
» Questions importantes lors d'un entretien d'embauche
» Les 20 questions essentielles avant de se mettre à son compt
» Une nouvelle avec des tas de questions
» Les 20 questions essentielles avant de se mettre à son compt
» quelques questions

Permission de ce forum:Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum
AMicale des COXiens :: Forum public :: Le coin du barman...-
Sauter vers: